Beach Walk 578 – Elephants and Giraffes

My cold came back, and so I am dressed for warmth (NOT fashion!) on this windy morning!

There is the very old email that I received again last week from a very dear friend. Reading it this time I figured out why I didn’t like it. It has that superior, “gottcha!” energy to it, and when examined, is actually based on a grammatical and logic errors. Read it yourself here and note the second comment from “Anon.” This person came to the same conclusions as I did, ๐Ÿ™‚ Thinking outside the box is a great concept, but it rarely can be boiled down to something so simplistic and illogical as this little ditty. It just gives consultants a bad name. And really, we do much more useful stuff for our clients than make them feel stupid for not being able to guess the “correct” answer to juvenile, artificial constructs.

Hawaiian Word:
Hewa: error

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Comments

  1. I have two examples of this and why is makes me crazy. I guess if I understood it initially I might think it (and me) was clever. But when I don’t get it, I feel dumb. Then after I’ve thought about it I catch myself making a value judgment about the person whose words I didn’t understand – and the judgment is less than kind (and I’m working on that too).

    1. A simple court notice from a lawyer about an upcoming hearing where you have the option to attend. I had to read it 4 times before I knew what the 3 pages of lawyer-speak was talking about and that attendance was optional.

    2. A coworker that uses cutsie statements or analogies with me that I end up nodding in agreement with because I’m too embarrassed to say I don’t understand.

    That beach, water and wind looks heavenly today.

    Mahalo for helping me start my week on the right foot!

  2. omg… I was reading that email and it started to piss me off! Ha. It reminds me a lot of advertising today… and it amounts to a whole lotta nada – just say what ya gotta say and be done with it. People aren’t impressed with this kind of mumbo-jumbo any more. This reminds me of my clients who come up with tricky schemes for their advertising slogans. This is so funny… Mahalo Rox – good show :)))

  3. Susan and my dog Lexie says:

    My thoughts regarding this reading: It gives “stupid” a bad name!
    Reminds me of actual TV news, using some lead news story as an advertising tease, without telling you ANYTHING about what the actual news is. ‘Thanks, guys’ ๐Ÿ™ One evening I counted four of these teases from one network, and decided to just turn on the computer to read up if there was, in fact, something newsworthy. Now they’re giving “yellow news” a bad name…

    Rox, take care of that cold and the proverbial frog in the throat — unless, it too is at that Animal Convention!!

  4. Thanks Rox for starting this… today I got an email about one of those Jung personality tests and of course I had to look at the questions… all ambiguous questions that end up pigeon-holing you into a defined “personality” with recommended career choices, etc. Thanks for setting me up for a laugh Rox, otherwise I would have probably been annoyed by the questions, Mahalo!

  5. @Jonnie – I can get irritated too – as you saw in this episode, and in the end, I love how we help each other come back from the brink and leave it in the sea.

    @shawnotay – you are on a roll! However, I have gotten a lot of benefit out of the Jungian tests – not sure how it would get condensed down to an email. And really, it is the energy for me – that one I referenced was just so snooty.

    @Susan and my dog Lexie – this is animal convention week – wait til you see tomorrow’s episode. ๐Ÿ™‚